Cicadia “Sheds” Their Rough Start to Release Incredible New Music

On October 24, OKC band Cicadia released their EP, Exuviate. The five-track collection is the first for the band – both under this name and with these members.

Cicadia consists of Dylan McBride (vocals and lyrical composition), Jeremy Dolezel (guitar), Caleb Klusmeyer (guitar and lead songwriter), Ethan Bybee (bass), and Dylan Brooks (drums). Dolezel and Klusmeyer are the only two original members, having begun the project about two years ago under the name “Øver Cast.”

The group underwent a series of changes at the beginning of this year that led to them recruiting new people – including borrowing McBride from Lilac Kings for vocals (to trade, Klusmeyer joined Lilac Kings as their bassist).

The band cites the genre “swancore” as their main influence. (“Swancore” is defined as a type of post-hardcore music that is “melodic” and “mathy.”) Their main inspirations come from Dance Gavin Dance, Hail the Sun, Royal Coda, Body Thief, Circa Survive, and Sianvar.

Their debut EP, Exuviate, consists of five songs – beginning with “Last Laugh” and ending with “Obsessive Composure.” Each one is expertly crafted and beautifully played.

First on the list is “Last Laugh;” a haunting melody is paired with dark lyrics to create this deeply disturbed song. According to McBride, “Last Laugh” is about “sucking it up” and “going through with something you may or may not feel is morally correct.” All of this is evident by the depressed resignation in the lyrics. The song picks up towards the end, topping it off with angry cries.

With swirling, layered music, the next song, “Troubleshoot Protocol” achieves an anxiety-filled sound. Desperation, frustration, and fear shine through every note. The song, McBride claims, is about someone “struggling with … feeling relevant in life… and how to deal with… the emotions that come with thinking they’re not.” This thought is emphasized by the line,”we’re all just dying to get by.”

The next track is the instrumental “Emergence Theory.” Something of an interlude, the piece breaks the high-emotion songs in half, serving as relief from the heaviness.

Following it is “Interrelation,” a ballad of being “afraid to fall in love.” The song denotes one-half of couple in a close, friends-with-benefits sort of relationship fearing the possibility of it developing into more.

“Obsessive Composure” is about “fighting yourself for who you want to be as a person – and how it affects you and your relationships.” This one is very clearly the fight song of the collection. Battle music scores lines dripping in inner conflict.

Every bit of Exuviate is well-worth the listen. It’s the kind of music you can get angry with and the kind that prompts inner exploration. Packed with a plethora of one-liners and quote-worthy material and combined with tunes that perfectly embody inner strife, Cicadia’s new music come highly recommended.

Check out Cicadia on all social media and music streaming sites, and be sure to listen to the new music:

Have an opinion on Cicadia? Know of an bands/musicians that deserve a feature? Let us know in the comments or email us at starcatchermagazine@gmail.com.

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Caity Robb

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